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Find out what that code from FairFight means and what to do if you think it’s a mistake.

WHAT'S FAIRFIGHT? FairFight is the server-side anticheat system we use in Battlefield 1 and other EA games to make online play safe and fair for everyone. If you violate our Terms of Service, including doing any sort of hacking or cheating, or using bots, online in Battlefield 1, your account might get kicked or banned by FairFight. WHAT DOES THIS CODE MEAN? The kick or ban code gives insight to why you were banned, and for how long. You were kicked by FairFight. Stated reason: 1 Week Suspension - LvL3 Monitoring Active #o3Z82z

  • We have temporarily blocked your access to the online gameplay portion of Battlefield 1 for 1 week (168 hours) and your stats might be reset.
You were kicked by FairFight. Stated reason: Banned Code #RSuhf1
  • We have permanently blocked your access to the online gameplay portion of Battlefield 1 and your stats might be reset.
WHY DID I GET THE CODE? If you’ve been suspended or banned, you may have violated our Terms of Service. Violations are determined by EA in its sole discretion, if you: Promote, encourage, or take part in any activity involving hacking, cracking, phishing, taking advantage of exploits or cheats and/or distribution of counterfeit software and/or virtual currency or items. Examples of such behavior in Battlefield 1 include, but are not limited to:
  • Use of third-party software, such as aimbots, wallhacks, and other similar cheats in order to gain an unfair advantage over other players
  • Abuse of game features in an unintended manner to stack on scores in an artificial manner - also known as stat padding.
Our penalty system is cumulative, meaning that if you continue to violate our Terms of Service, the penalty applied may increase in severity, and may ultimately result in permanent account closure. Account closure is reserved for the most serious breaches of our Terms of Service, but can also be applied in cases where an account has accumulated a number of violations over a period of time. WHAT CAN I DO ABOUT IT? If you think your ban or suspension is incorrect: Talk to us at lets_talk@ea.com.

FairFight is the server-side anticheat system we use in Battlefield 1 and other EA games to help keep online play safe and fair for everyone.

If you break our rules, including doing any sort of hacking or cheating, or using bots online in Battlefield 1, your account might get kicked or banned by FairFight.

The kick or ban code tells you why you were banned, and for how long.

You were kicked by FairFight. Stated reason: 1 Week Suspension - LvL3 Monitoring Active #o3Z82z

  • We have temporarily blocked your access to the online gameplay portion of Battlefield 1 for 1 week (168 hours) and your stats might be reset.

 You were kicked by FairFight. Stated reason: Banned Code #RSuhf1

  • We have permanently blocked your access to the online gameplay portion of Battlefield 1 and your stats might be reset.

If you’ve been suspended or banned, you may have broken our rules.

You break EA’s rules  if you:

  • Promote, encourage, or take part in any activity involving hacking, cracking, phishing, taking advantage of exploits or cheats and/or distribution of counterfeit software and/or virtual currency or items.

Examples of breaking the rules in Battlefield 1 include, but are not limited to:

  • Use of third-party software, such as aimbots, wallhacks, and other similar cheats in order to gain an unfair advantage over other players.
  • Abuse of game features in an unintended manner to stack on scores in an artificial manner--also known as "stat padding."

Our penalty system is cumulative. This means that if you keep breaking the rules, we may need to close your EA Account.

We want to keep you in the game:

If you think your ban or suspension was a mistake:

Learn how to get in touch wtih us so we can talk about it.

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